School Health Services Department

The School Health Services Department provides coordinated school-based nursing services to ensure quality individualized health services. Our goal is to facilitate daily school attendance and enhance academic achievement, guiding students toward a healthy future. We work closely with individualized schools, families and the community in keeping children healthy. 

Guiding Students Toward A Healthy Future

If your child becomes ill or has an emergency, it is important that we be able to reach you. Please make sure that the school has an accurate telephone number(s) listed for you. This will enable the school to contact you in the event that your child needs you during the school day. Please remember to send new work telephone numbers to school if you change jobs and update cell phone numbers that change.

Becky Little Director of Health Services

Becky Little
Director of Health Services

423-272-7629  Ext:2002
Email : becky.little@hck12.net

Frequently Asked Questions

Immunizations

1.  What immunizations are required for child care facilities and preschools?

  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib): age younger than 5 years only (this requirement is resumed following suspension during a national Hib vaccine shortage 2008-2009)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV): age younger than 5 years only
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (1 dose of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (1 dose or history of disease)
  • Hepatitis A (1 dose by 18 months of age)

2.  What immunizations are required for Kindergarten?

  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): final dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease): previously only one dose was required
  • Hepatitis A (2 doses): effective July 1, 2011

3.  What additional immunizations are required for 7th grade?

  • Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis booster ("Tdap")

4.  Are there exemptions for vaccines?

  • Medical: Healthcare provider must indicate which specific vaccines are medically exempted (because of risk of harm) on the new form. Other vaccines remain required.
  • Religious: Requires only a signed statement by the parent/guardian that vaccination conflicts with their religious tenets or practices. If documentation of a health examination is required, it must be noted by the health care provider on the immunization certificate. In that case, the provider may explain the absence of immunization information by checking that the parent has obtained a religious exemption. Exemption form is located under documents. 

 

Medication

1.  Can my child take medications while at school?

Medications will be given at school only when the student's health requires that they be given during school hours.

Prescription medications that are given during school hours require a Physician's signature. A "Permission for Medication" form will need to be completed and on file.

Over-the-Counter (Non-Prescription) medications brought from home also require a "Permission for Medication" form to be completed and on file.

The School Clinic provides a limited variety of over-the-counter medications and first aid supplies. A "Health Information" card will need to be completed before these medications will be administered.

2.  Can my child carry their own medications to school?

Students should not carry their own medications to and from school. A parent is responsible for bringing medications to the school and back home themselves. Students who are found to carry medications are subject to disciplanary action.  This includes prescription and non prescription medications.

An exception to this is inhalers and Epi-Pens. Physician and Parent approval are required to carry an inhaler or Epi-Pen. Also, a "Self Possession" form must be signed by the parent, and on file, for a student to carry their inhaler or Epi-Pen.

All medications must be brought in the original container with the prescription label attached that contains the child's name, medication name and dosage. Over-the-counter medicines must be brought in by the parent in the original, unopened package.

Diabetic students are allowed to carry their diabetic supplies (Glucose tabs, insulin, monitors, etc).

 

When should my child stay home from school?

1.  When should my child stay home from school?

In general, students should stay home if they have fever of 101 degrees or higher with behavior changes or other symptoms of illness, if their symptoms will prevent them from comfortably participating in school activities, and/or if recommended by a health care provider. Children may return to school once their fever and symptoms have resolved for 24 hours (without medication) and they are able to participate in school activities. Children with common colds, runny noses, cough, ear infection, and/or watery eyes do not need to be kept home unless the symptoms above are present.

Here are recommendations for some other special situations:
Abdominal Pain
Children should remain home and be evaluated by a health professional if pain lasts more than 2 hours or occurs with fever or other symptoms.

Chicken Pox
Children should remain home until all blisters have dry, complete scabs, and the student has no new lesions for 24 hours. This is usually seven (7) days from the beginning of the breakout with the pox.

Conjunctivitis/ Pink eye
(Red/pink eye, crusty/sticky drainage)
Conjunctivitis / Pink Eye can result from many causes, including viruses, bacteria, allergens, contact lens use, chemicals, fungi, and certain diseases. Students requiring treatment for infection may return twenty-four (24)hours after treatment is started by their healthcare provider. To return, symptoms of eye drainage should be reduced. If no treatment is required, the student may return to school.

Diarrhea
Diarrhea may be tough on children to deal with at school and can be a sign that your child has a contagious infection. Children should be kept home if they are having frequent diarrhea, accidents, or stools with blood or mucus. Students with bloody diarrhea require a note from their healthcare professional to return to school.

Hepatitis A
Student should remain home for 1 week after symptoms started, or as directed by their healthcare professional.

Impetigo
Student may return to school the day after treatment begins. Sores should be covered when the child returns to school.

Lice/Nits (Pediculosis)
Children may attend school if lice have been treated. Please also refer to Pediculosis Policy 6.4031

Rash with Fever or Behavior Changes
Student should remain home until cleared to return to school by their healthcare professional.

Ringworm
Student may return to school the day after treatment begins. Areas should be covered when the child returns to school.

Scabies
Student may return to school the day after treatment begins.

Staph Infection
Students with symptoms should be kept home from school until seen by provider and advised regarding appropriate treatment.

Strep Throat
Student should remain home until they have taken antibiotics for 24 hours. Student may return if they received one dose of antibiotics on the day of diagnosis, and one dose the following day before school.

Vomiting
Student should remain home if vomited twice in the past 24 hours, unless cleared to return by their healthcare provider.

Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
Student should remain home until treated by their healthcare provider with antibiotics for at least 5 days.

Vaping Information for Parents

Hawkins County School District, similar to many other districts, has seen a recent spike in incidents involving student vaping.  Unfortunately, there is varying information and misunderstandings involving vaping and electronic cigarettes.  The purpose of this letter is to inform you of the issue and to share resources if you feel your child is involved in this behavior.  Due to the numerous negative effects of vaping, we are taking this issue very seriously; vaping is not only against school policy, it is also very dangerous.   

Vaping is the act of inhaling a vapor produced by an electronic vaporizer or e-cigarette.  The inhaled vapor can contain nicotine, THC (a chemical found in marijuana), and other substances. The liquids that are vaporized come in many different flavors and might even smell fruity.  Many of the flavors of these liquid concentrates, or ‘vape juices’, are sweet and have names such as, cinnamon roll, marshmallow, bubblegum, lemonade and cookies.

Vaporizers and e-cigarettes come in all different shapes and sizes; some will look like pens, a stylus for computers, and even flash drives.  Most of these devices are very small and can be easily hidden.  One of the newest trends in vaping is ‘Juuling.’ Juuling is a very discreet form of vaping; a Juul closely resembles a thumb drive.  Please see the pictures below. 

Much like other tobacco/nicotine products, stores cannot sell vaping items to anyone under the age of 18; however, students have reported that these items can easily be purchased on-line. We hope that you have found this letter informative and helpful.  It remains our goal to partner with parents to best support all students in making positive decisions. Please consider talking to your child about the dangers of electronic cigarettes and vaping.  If you think your student has been experimenting with vaping, or has a nicotine addiction, please contact one of our school counselors for support.  For more information about vaping please visit the websites below. 

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/e-cigarettes/index.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/index.htm 

https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov/documents/SGR_ECig_ParentTipSheet_508.pdf

Vaping Examples
Our School Nurses
Debbie Alder, RN

Debbie Alder, RN
Cherokee High

Lisa Bledsoe, LPN

Lisa Bledsoe, LPN
Joseph Rogers Primary

Rebecca Chandler, LPN

Rebecca Chandler, LPN
Surgoinsville Elementary

Heather Christian, RN

Heather Christian, RN
Church Hill Middle

Michelle Crowder, RN

Michelle Crowder, RN
Volunteer High

Regina Hagood, LPN

Regina Hagood, LPN
Clinch

Amanda Hickernell, LPN

Amanda Hickernell, LPN
Surgoinsville Middle

Keri Masters RN

Keri Masters RN
Mt. Carmel Elementary

Tina Mellons LPN

Tina Mellons LPN
Carter's Valley Elem.

AdraAnn Miley LPN

AdraAnn Miley LPN
St. Clair Elementary
Mooresburg Elementary

Kristen Morgan, LPN

Kristen Morgan, LPN
Hawkins Elementary

Lacey Richards, LPN

Lacey Richards, LPN
Bulls Gap

Melita Ringley RN

Melita Ringley RN
Rogersville Middle School

Amy Williams, LPN

Amy Williams, LPN
Church Hill Elementary

Virginia Winstead LPN

Virginia Winstead LPN
Church Hill Intermediate

Sheleena Cook

Sheleena Cook
Health Assistant
Mooresburg Elementary

Misty Mallory

Misty Mallory
Health Assistant
St. Clair Elementary

Elizabeth Jones

Elizabeth Jones
504 Health Assistant
Keplar Elementary

Contact
Becky Little
Director of Health Services
Becky Little Director of Health Services

423-272-7629  Ext:2002
Email : becky.little@hck12.net

Amy Lipe
Health Educator
Amy Lipe Health Educator

423-272-7629  Ext:2015
Email : amy.lipe@hck12.net

Links

American Academy Of Pediatrics

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Drug Free

Head Lice

News, FAQs, Report, Protection Kids & Families, Educational Resources, Kids: Head Games, Bug Fun Activities.

Healthy Children: Information For Parents

Kids Health

For Parents: Knowledge, advice, and comfort.
For Kids: Homework help and how the body works.
For Teens: Answers, advice and straight talk.
For Educators: Health in the Classroom.

New Website for Families: Kidcentral TN

This new website provides information on health, education, development and support to Tennessee families, as well as a searchable State Services Directory. Families will also be able to create their own private profiles on this site, which will allow them to receive information that matters to the specific needs of their families.

Talking With Kids About Tough Issues

Talk with your kids before everyone else does.

The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools

TN Department of Health