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2017-18 Testing Dates

2017-18 Testing Information

As required by Public Chapter 892, and the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this is a listing of state mandated assessments for the 2017-18 school year. Hawkins County Schools will administer TNReady Tests (TCAP) during the Tennessee Department Of Education(TDOE) specified windows that may be found at the following website:

http://www.tennessee.gov/education/topic/testing-dates

Each school will establish their own testing schedule within the TDOE testing window. Please check with your child’s school to determine when specific tests will be administered during the TDOE testing window.

Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) testing requirements are the same as the previous requirements of No Child Left Behind. States still test students in reading and math yearly in grades 3-8 and in select courses in High School. The federal government requires schools and districts to test 95 percent of all student subgroups.

The following assessments will be given during the 2017-18 school year. Dates for these assessments and timelines for reporting the results will be determined by the Tennessee Department of Education. Please visit www.tn.gov/education for the most up to date information on state required testing. The tests are given to help measure how much a student grows academically over the course of a school year and are utilized by the school district to plan for instruction.

 

Assessments: (From TDOE Website June 13, 2017)

http://www.tn.gov/education/topic/testing-overview

 

 TCAP for Grades 3–8

Overview: Each subject-area test is divided into multiple subparts and will be administered during one testing window at the end of the school year.

  • English language arts (4 subparts) will assess the Tennessee Academic Standards through literary and informational texts requiring students to demonstrate the ability to read closely, analyze text, answer text-dependent questions, provide a written response to a prompt, and demonstrate command of the English language. Additionally, in grades 3 and 4, fluency, comprehension, and listening skills are measured.
  • Mathematics (3 subparts) will consist of both calculator permitted and calculator prohibited subparts. It assesses the Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep conceptual understanding of mathematics, number sense, fluency, problem solving and an understanding of the grade-level horizontal coherence embedded within the standards. The mathematics test will focus approximately 70 percent of the assessment items on major work of the grade and approximately 30 percent of the items on supporting work.
  • Science (1 subpart in grades 3-4; 2 subparts in grades 5-8) will assess the current Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep conceptual understanding of scientific concepts in Life Science, Earth and Space Science and Physical Science.
  • Social studies (1 subpart in grades 3-4; 2 subparts in grades 5-8) will assess the current Tennessee Academic Standards for social studies requiring students to demonstrate historical awareness, geographical understanding and the ability to analyze primary source documents.

 Required: Yes

Federal and State Law: Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015 and T.C.A. § 49-1-602 pertaining to district and school accountability. Modified assessments in Braille and large print are also provided in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1990.

Purpose & Use: The TCAP tests are designed to assess true student understanding and not just basic memorization and test-taking skills. TCAP measures student understanding of our state standards.

Administration Window: Districts may select a more specific testing window within the state’s testing window of April 16 through May 4. However, English subpart 1, which includes a written response, must be administered in the first week.

Results to Districts:  Raw data is provided to districts at the very end of school year. This information may be used to help calculate final grades for report cards. State law requires TCAP scores be included as a percentage of a student’s grade in grades

3-8. Districts do have the flexibility, as provided in state law, to exclude TNReady data from student grades if the data is not available at least five instructional days before the last day for students.

Results to Parents & Students:  Score reports from the 2016-17 school year for grades 3–8 will be released to parents and students in fall 2017.

Score reports from the 2017-18 school year for grades 3–8 will be released to parents and students in summer 2018.

 

 TCAP End-of-Course Assessments

Overview: Each subject-area test is divided into multiple subparts and will be administered during one testing window at the end of the course.

  •  English I, English II, and English III (4 subparts) assess the Tennessee Academic Standards through literary and informational texts requiring students to demonstrate the ability to read closely, analyze text, answer text-dependent questions, provide a written response to a prompt, and demonstrate command of the English language.
  • Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II and Integrated Math III (3 subparts) will consist of both calculator permitted and calculator prohibited subparts. Each assesses the Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep conceptual understanding of mathematics, fluency, problem solving, and an understanding of the grade-level horizontal coherence embedded within the standards. The mathematics test will focus approximately 60 percent of the assessment items on major work of the grade and approximately 40 percent of the items on supporting work.
  • Biology and Chemistry will assess current Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep understanding of scientific inquiry, engineering and technology as related to the scientific concepts in the course.
  • U.S. History and Geography (3 subparts) will consist of a written response item requiring students to provide a response to a prompt with the use of several sources as well as multiple choice and multiple select items. Students will be assessed on the current Tennessee Academic Standards and be required to demonstrate a deep understanding of civics, economics, geography within the context of U.S. History with special attention to Tennessee connections.

 Required: Yes

Federal and State Law: Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015 and T.C.A. § 49-1-602 pertaining to district and school accountability. Modified assessments in Braille and large print are also provided in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1990.

 Purpose & Use: The TCAP tests are designed to assess true student understanding and not just basic memorization and test-taking skills. TCAP measures student understanding of our state standards. TCAP EOC assessments are given to help measure how much a student grows academically in a particular content area.

Administration Window:  Districts may select a more specific testing window within the state’s testing window of November 27 through December 15 for fall block schedule and April 16 through May 4 for spring block and traditional schedules. Subpart 1 of the English language arts and U.S. History/Geography assessments, which include written responses, must be administered the first week of the administration window.

Results to Districts: Raw data is provided to districts at the very end of school year (districts will receive fall block data at the very end of the first semester). This information may be used to help calculate final grades for report cards. State board policy requires TCAP scores be included as a percentage of a high school student’ end-of-course grades. Districts do have the flexibility, as provided in state law, to exclude TNReady data from student grades if the data is not available at least five instructional days before the last day for students.

Results to Parents & Students: Score reports from the 2016-17 school year for EOC assessments will be released to parents and students in summer 2017.

Score reports from the 2017-18 school year for EOC assessments will be released to parents and students in summer 2018.

  

 MSAA for Students with Disabilities

Overview: The Multi-State Alternate Assessment (MSAA) is the English language arts and math assessment for students in grades 3–8 and grade 11 with the most significant cognitive disabilities. MSAA is administered online by the teacher.

Required: Yes

Federal and State Law: The development of alternate achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities is authorized under a department regulation (34 C.F.R. Part 200) published on December 9, 2003, and T.C.A §  49-1-612. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title I require inclusion of all students with disabilities in the state assessment system.

Purpose & Use: This test is given to help measure how much a student grows academically over the course of a school year. Administration Window:  March 19–May 11 (Tentative)

Length of Assessment: Students are given the assessment during class time throughout the window based on student needs and class schedules.

Results to Districts:  Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer. Results to Parents & Students:  Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 

TCAP-Alt for Students with Disabilities

Overview: TCAP-Alt is the assessment for science and social studies for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. Students are assessed in grades 3–8 for both science and social studies and in grade 10 for Biology. TCAP-Alt is administered via paper by the teacher.

Required: Yes

Federal and State Law: The development of alternate achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities is authorized under a department regulation (34 C.F.R. Part 200) published on December 9, 2003, and T.C.A § 49-1-612. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title I require inclusion of all students with disabilities in the state assessment system.

Purpose & Use: This test is given to help measure how much a student grows academically over the course of a school year.

Administration Window:  March 19–May 11 (Tentative)

Length of Assessment: Students are given the assessment during class time throughout the window based on student needs and class schedules.

Results to Districts:  Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer. Results to Parents & Students:  Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 

 ACCESS for English Learners

Overview: English Learners will take the ACCESS for ELLs to determine language proficiency. ACCESS assesses students in the four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Required: Yes

Federal and State Law: Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015. Purpose & Use: Administered to English Learners to evaluate English proficiency.

Administration Window:  March 5–April 20 (Tentative)

Length of Assessment: The test is self-paced with target administration times for each section of the test as follows:

  •  Listening: Up to 40 minutes
  • Reading: Up to 35 minutes
  • Speaking: Up to 30 minutes
  • Writing Tier A: Up to 45 minutes
  • Writing Tiers B/C: Up to 60 minutes

 

 Results to Districts:  Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer. Results to Parents & Students:  Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 

 ACT and SAT

Overview: Students in Tennessee are required to take a college entrance exam (either the ACT or SAT) in the eleventh grade. This is now a graduation requirement for student seeking a regular or honors diploma. Districts in Tennessee contract with ACT to provide an opportunity to take the ACT at their own school during the school day at no cost to the student.

Required: Yes

Federal and State Law: Administered in accordance with T.C.A § 49-6-6001(b).

Purpose & Use: Our vision for student success in Tennessee is that all students are equipped with the knowledge and skills to successfully embark on their chosen path in life. Empowering our students to pursue the education and training that matches their chosen career pathway is essential to this vision. In order to prepare our students with the knowledge and skills valued by both employers and postsecondary educators, the department has set two major strategic goals:

  • By 2020, the average composite score on the ACT (or equivalent on the SAT) will be a 21.
  • By 2020, the majority of high school graduates will be on track to receive a postsecondary degree or credential.
Administration Window: ACT state testing dates:
  • Paper testing: March 20, April 3, and April 24, 2018
  • Accommodations window:   March 20-April 3, 2018
  • Online window:  March 20-29, 2018 (Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday only)

 

 SAT

Students may register to take the SAT on the following dates in 2017: August 26, October 7, November 4, and December 2.

Dates in 2018 include: March 10, May 5, and June 2.

ACT

  • English: 45 minutes
  • Math: 60 minutes
  • Reading: 35 minutes
  • Science: 35 minutes

 

 SAT:

  • 25-minute essay
  • Six 25-minute sections (mathematics, critical reading and writing)
  • Two 20-minute sections (mathematics, critical reading and writing)
  • 10-minute multiple choice writing section

 

Results to Districts:  District receive ACT results 2-3 months after state testing is complete.

Results to Parents & Students:  ACT results are delivered to parents and students 3-8 weeks after the assessment. SAT results are delivered to parents and students

  

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

Overview: The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. Assessments are conducted periodically in mathematics, reading, science, writing, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and in Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL). In 2017, NAEP began administering digitally based assessments (DBA) for mathematics, reading, and writing, with additional subjects to be added in 2018 and 2019. Only a small sample of Tennessee fourth, eighth, and twelfth graders will

take this test. The representative sample group is chosen by NAEP each year. NAEP alternates sample sizes every other year, with even-year assessments being a national sample, and odd-year assessments being state samples.

Required: Yes, NAEP is required for fourth and eighth grade students at selected schools.

Federal and State Law: Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015, which requires the state to participate in the biennial state academic assessments of fourth and eighth grade reading and mathematics. Districts that receive Title I funds are required to participate.

Purpose & Use: NAEP assessments are administered uniformly using the same sets of test booklets across the nation, NAEP results serve as a common metric for all states and selected urban districts. The assessment stays essentially the same from year to year, with only carefully documented changes. This permits NAEP to provide a clear picture of student academic progress over time. In even-numbered years, NAEP measures Tennessee student’s academic achievement against students in other states also taking this test.

Administration Window: January 29-March 9, 2018

Length of Assessment: 60–90 minutes

Results to Districts: District-level results are not provided.

Results to Parents & Students: Student-level results are not provided.

 

TCAP Grade 2 Optional Assessment

 Overview: The Grade 2 optional assessment measures student mastery of the Tennessee Academic Standards in English Language Arts and mathematics.

 The English language arts (ELA) assessment uses an integrated format to measure student progress through literary and informational texts requiring students to demonstrate the ability to read closely, analyze text, answer text-dependent questions, provide a written response to a prompt, and demonstrate command of the English language. Additionally, it measures fluency, comprehension, and listening skills.

The mathematics assessment will focus approximately 70 percent of the assessment items on major work of the grade and approximately 30 percent of the items on supporting and additional work. Student mastery of math fluency, ability to problem solve, and understanding of the grade-level standards will be assessed. Further, students will be assessed on their ability to connect topics across the grade-level domains.

Required: No

Federal and State Law: Not applicable; participation is voluntary

Purpose & Use: This test is given to help measure how much a second grade student grows academically over the course of a school year.

Administration Window: April 23–May 4

Results to Districts: Raw data is provided to districts by the very end of school year. This information may be used to help calculate final grades for report cards.

Results to Parents & Students: Grade 2 assessment results from the 2016-17 school year will be released to parents and students in fall 2017. Grade 2 assessment results from the 2017-18 school year will be released to parents and students in summer 2018.

 

TCAP Grade 2 Alternate Assessment for Students with Disabilities

 Overview: The TCAP Grade 2 Alternate assessment is the English language arts and math assessment for students in grade 2 with the most significant cognitive disabilities. The grade 2 Alternate assessment is administered via paper by the teacher.

Required: No, however if a district opts to administer the TCAP grade 2 Alternate Assessment, they must also administer the grade 2 Alternate Assessment to eligible students.

Federal and State Law: The development of alternate achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities is authorized under a department regulation (34 C.F.R. Part 200) published on December 9, 2003, and T.C.A § 49-1-612. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title I require inclusion of all students with disabilities in the state assessment system.

Purpose & Use: This test is given to help measure how much a student grows academically over the course of a school year. Administration Window:  March 19–May 11

 Length of Assessment: Students are given the assessment during class time throughout the window based on student needs and class schedules.

Results to Districts:  Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer. Results to Parents & Students:  Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 Testing Times by Grade/Subject (from TDOE website June 13, 2017)

http://tn.gov/education/topic/testing-times-by-grade-subject

 

 District Level Assessment

 

Aims Web

Aimsweb is a form of curriculum-based measurement (CBM). It is used for universal screening and progress monitoring as required by Tennessee Department of Education for Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTI2). It is a brief assessment that measures overall performance of key foundational skills at each grade level (grades K-8) in the areas Reading/Language Arts, and math. The assessment will be used to progress monitor students’ academic skills in RLA and math to identify key areas where students may need additional academic support.

 Students are benchmarked three times per year (beginning, middle, and end of the year). Each of the two assessments (Reading/language Arts and math), will take approximately ten minutes for the student to complete each academic area. Depending on the results from the benchmark assessments, students are assigned to one of three Tier Levels (I, II, or III) and provided intervention to work on deficit areas. To determine if the intervention is working, students are progress monitored every other week (Tier II) or weekly (Tier III).

Schools will determine schedules during the testing window.

Reports will be sent to parents outlining performance on the benchmark assessment and the progress monitoring.

 

*All testing dates and windows are jubject to change with Tennessee Date Department of Education or Hawkins County Board of Education approval*


It is the policy of the Hawkins County School System not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability in its educational programs or employment policies as required by Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Title IX (1972 Educational Amendments), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.